Simple Recipe for Sour-dough Bread

Full credit to Doves Farm UK    Looking for Doves Farm?

Sour Dough Bread is a wonderful and very trendy choice of bread – just takes a week or so to get started on your own bread – (… a week of patience) and then it’s so easy 😊

I have used this simple recipe for a long time and its just wonderful.

Gluten Free White Sourdough Bread

There are three distinct stages to making a sourdough loaf:

  • the starter,
  • the ferment, and
  • the dough itself.

A whole grain flour, such as brown rice or quinoa, is best for making the starter.  This loaf rises in a banneton – (a particular styled tray) which will leave its pattern on the dough when is transferred to your oven tray. You could also raise in a bowl and cook in large bread tin. (a 1kg/2lb bread tin)

 

Starter

8-10 tbsp GF Flour of choice

8-10 tbsp tepid water

 

Ferment

100g (3.5oz) starter – from above

150g (5.3oz) GF Flour of choice

200ml (0.4pt) tepid water

 

 

Dough

500g (17.6oz) GF White Bread Flour

1 tsp salt

150ml (0.3pt) tepid water

450ml (0.8pt) ferment – from above

 

Flour for dusting

1 tbsp oil, for drizzling

 

 

Gluten Free Starter – Important helpful notes

  • Brown Rice Flour, Quinoa Flour or other gluten free whole grain flours are best for making and feeding a gluten free starter.
  • The starter needs to be fed with the regular addition of gluten free flour and water which will stimulate activity.
  • Please make a written record to help you remember the time of your last and next flour and water feed – (use a kitchen timer or set your phone alarm.)
  • Keep and feed your starter in a glass bowl, loosely covered with some cling film or a clean, wet tea towel.
  • Avoid keeping the bowl tightly sealed.
  • The ideal temperature for all of your sourdough stages is a warm place at 22-24°C/70-75°.
  • In cooler room temperatures the starter will take longer to become active so allow for more time between feeds.
  • At warmer room temperatures the starter will become active more quickly and will need feeding more often.
  • Small or large bubbles, a lumpy appearance, a honeycomb texture beneath the surface and a pleasing sour or slightly alcoholic aroma are all signs that your starter is becoming active.
  • If your tap water contains chlorine, use bottled water instead.
  • After feeding the starter with your gluten free flour and water, it should have the consistency of thick custard or porridge and amounts of flour and water can be adjusted to achieve this: if necessary, slightly increase the flour or water to achieve the desired consistency.
  • A larger quantity of starter will need a bigger flour and water feed than a smaller quantity.
  • A dry, flat, sweaty or watery looking starter usually means a feed of flour and water is urgently needed.
  • If a dark, alcoholic smelling liquid forms on the surface of the starter it means your starter has been active but is getting tired so pour off the liquid and feed with flour and water.
  • Remove and discard any mouldy looking crust at the edge of the bowl.
  • Feeding a starter when it looks active (i.e bubbly) will encourage increased activity.
  • To use up any left-over starter, why not make some gluten free sourdough flatbreads or gluten free sourdough pancakes. Otherwise dispose of any unused starter, or keep it at room temperature and feed it regularly until your next baking session.
  • An active starter can be kept in a refrigerator and will need feeding every 7 – 10 days. It can also be frozen but needs a warm place, and flour and water feeds to re-establish its activity.

 

How To make Sour Dough Starter 😊

  1. On the first day, put one tablespoon of flour and one of water into a 500ml glass bowl and mix together. Cover loosely with cling film and leave in a warm place for about 12 hours.
  2. After the 12 hours have passed, add another tablespoon of flour and another two of water, mix together, cover loosely and leave for another 12 hours.
  3. On day two (24 hours since beginning your starter) stir in a third tablespoon of flour and a third of water stir to mix, cover loosely and leave in a warm place for 12 hours.
  4. For the second feed on day two, add a tablespoon of flour and one of water, stir to mix, cover loosely and leave in a warm place for 12 hours.
  5. For the first feed of day three (36 hours since beginning your starter), increase the feed by adding two tablespoons of flour and two of water, stir to mix, cover loosely and leave in a warm place for 12 hours.
  6. On the second fee of day three add two tablespoons of flour and another two of water, mix together and, cover loosely and leave for another 12 hours.
  7. At this point your starter should be bubbly and ready to create your ferment. If the starter is not showing bubbles, repeat the 12-hour flour and water feeding routine, and ensure the starter is kept in a constantly warm place.

Ferment

  1. Once your starter is bubbly, stir the starter and then measure 100g of the starter into a large mixing bowl.
  2. Add 150g flour and 200ml water, stir to make a paste, cover loosely with cling film and leave in a warm place for 4-12 hours until bubbles appear. When bubbly, your ferment is ready to use (you can either dispose of any unused starter after bread making (or keep and feed it regularly until your next baking session 😊  ).

Dough

  1. Dust the inside of the banneton or bread tin with flour and line a large oven tray with parchment.
  2. Add the white bread flour, salt and water to the bowl of ferment and stir to mix.
  3. Continue stirring to make a sticky mass of dough. Avoid adding flour.
  4. Drizzle the oil over the dough and turn the mixture a couple of times in the bowl.
  5. Tip the dough into the prepared banneton, cover with oiled cling film and leave in a warm place until double in size which may take 4 – 12 hours.
  6. Pre-heat the oven.
  7. Remove the cling film and very gently turn the bread out of the banneton onto the prepared oven tray.
  8. Bake for 50 – 60 minutes. You will know the bread is cooked if the base sounds hollow when tapped.

 

Equipment – 25cm/10″ round banneton, or round baking tin,  parchment paper, large oven tray and glass bowl

Temperature – 220˚C, Fan 200˚C, 425˚F, Gas 7

Cooking time –  50 to 60 minutes

 

I’d love you to share photos and comments – it takes a while to get organised but fresh warm sour-dough is so trendy and wonderful – you’ll be a star 😊

5 thoughts on “Simple Recipe for Sour-dough Bread”

  1. As someone who is gluten intolerant recipes like this make me so happy! I am going to get this started as soon as I get home. Many people try gluten free diet because they think it will help them lose weight. I have to do the gluten free diet because when I eat gluten I experience pain for a few days. I am thankful for this recipe!

  2. I have made regular bread many times, but never sourdough bread and that too gluten-free. My sister has celiac disease so we are always searching what to serve her when she comes over. Do you know if sourdough bread and spinach dip go well together?

    I like how detailed your instructions are, this way I  will not have to go look for info all over the place. Some sites place a few instructions and then you are on your own. You have laid it out really well.

    1. Thank you for the support Eric – and for your sister too she’ll appreciate your efforts!

      Spinach Dip would be lovely with sourdough… another suggestion – (can’t help myself !! ,) ….

      When you’ve made the sourdough and it has cooled cut about a 1 inch slice off the top – pull out all the inside soft bread and keep it to served after.

      Fill the bread with your spinach dip, cover the top with grated cheese – of your choice and bake in a medium oven 160-170C for about 20 minutes. 

      With the inside bread – brake into pieces about 2 inches – 5cms and dry them in the oven while the cheese browns – just for the last 10 minutes – that will be a wonderful entertainment “yummy” addition – best when you get to breaking the shell of the bread with extra dip – just so popular in our family 🙂

  3. Thank you so much for this post! It’s like you were visiting my kitchen. I’m on my fourth attempt at sour dough. My first batch was a total failure. Awesome sour flavor but it was like a brick! Second batch was kinda good but I think my second rise was just too long. Third batch, I tried sprouted whole wheat & well, I had to dispose it. Now I’m on my fourth batch, but I’m apprehensive. I’m looking forward to all your tips!!! 🙂 I will like to know if it is really all that important to use a full tablespoon of salt? SO much salt?

    1. Hi Jordan – yes …. sorry if you misunderstood – its only 1 teaspoon of salt – this is exactly the recipe Doves Farm in the UK, I’ve used for a long time. I do believe we need salt and at least here we can see how much is involved,

      I like to crack fresh cracked Salt and Black pepper on the top of mine before baking too ! 🙂 

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